DevOps

Three Reasons Why Docker is a Game Changer

by Jake Bennett

Containers represent a fundamental evolution in software development, but not for the reasons most people think.

Image of containers being unloaded


Docker’s rapid rise to prominence has put it on the radar of almost every technologist today, both IT professionals and developers alike. Docker containers hold the promise of providing the ideal packaging and deployment mechanism for microservices, a concept which has also experienced a growing surge in popularity.

But while the industry loves its sparkling new technologies, it is also deeply skeptical of them. Until a new technology has been battletested, it’s just an unproven idea with a hipster logo, so it’s not surprising that Docker is being evaluated with a critical eye—it should be.

To properly assess Docker’s utility, however, it’s necessary to follow container-based architecture to its logical conclusion. The benefits of isolation and portability, which get most of the attention, are reasons enough to adopt Docker containers. But the real game changer, I believe, is the deployment of containers in clusters. Container clusters managed by a framework like Google’s Kubernetes, allow for the true separation of application code and infrastructure, and enable highly resilient and elastic architectures

It is these three benefits in combination—isolation, portability, and container clustering—that are the real reasons why Docker represents such a significant evolution in how we build and deploy software. Containers further advance the paradigm shift in application development brought about by cloud computing by providing a higher layer of abstraction for application deployment, a concept we’ll explore in more detail later.

Is Docker worth it?

However, you don’t get the benefits of containers for free: Docker does add a layer of complexity to application development. The learning curve for Docker itself is relatively small, but it gets steeper when you add clustering. The question then becomes: is the juice worth the squeeze? That is, do containers provide enough tangible benefit to justify the additional complexity? Or are we just wasting our time following the latest fad?

Certainly, Docker is not the right solution for every project. The Ruby/Django/Laravel/NodeJS crowd will be the first to point out that their PaaS-ready frameworks already give them rapid development, continuous delivery and portability. Continuous integration platform provider Circle CI wrote a hilarious post poking fun at Docker, transcribing a fictitious conversation in which a Docker evangelist tries to explain the benefits of containers to a Ruby developer. The resulting confusion about the container ecosystem perfectly captures the situation.

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